Euphorbia Fruticosa

Euphorbia Fruticosa

Euphorbia fruticosa is the largest group of Euphorbia. They prefer bright places, but many species grow well in shaded conditions. They need a dry winter. They are propagated by cuttings and seeds, they grow well.

Euphorbia trigona – comes from Central and South-West Africa.

A compact branched shrub or small tree 2 m tall or more. The trunk is 4-6 cm in diameter, divided into segments 10-25 cm long, with 3 winged edges, on the ribs with short sharp paired spines and lanceolate or teardrop-shaped leaves 3-5 cm long. The coloration is dark green, with a light green V-shaped pattern. Leaves usually die off in winter, but in the absence of direct sun can persist for up to several years.

Euphorbia trigona
Euphorbia trigona

Euphorbia trigona f. rubra– stems in the lower part are green, in the upper part burgundy. The leaves are also burgundy, the spines are brown. This species has formed with different shades of color of the stem and leaves (white, brown, red), for example:

Euphorbia lactea is native to tropical Asia.

It is often called a candelabra-shaped cactus. In nature, 3-6 m high. The stem is straight, almost from the base, overgrown with angular side shoots directed upwards. Shoots are usually simple, 3-4-sided, up to 5 cm in diameter, consist of oblong segments 10-30 cm long, green, with a light marble pattern. The leaves are rudimentary, rounded, 3-4 mm in diameter, reddish, formed only at the tips of young growths in summer and quickly fall off.

Euphorbia cristata – with wavy fan-shaped branches forming a crest-like appearance. The most common dark green form with silvery-gray zigzag patterns, but now this plant is represented by a large number of variegated varieties, the color of which varies from white to yellow, pink, purple and green.

Euphorbia grandicornis. The natural range covers KwaZulu-Natal, Swaziland, Mozambique, Kenya. It grows at low altitudes, on dry soils.

Succulent shrub up to 2 m tall. The stem is branched in tiers, 3-4-sided, up to 10 cm in diameter, with wing-shaped ribs, pale green in the center, consisting of twisted segments about 15 cm long. Along the ribs, there are paired spines in the form of a cow horn 3-7 cm long, and between them on young growths, there are tiny scaly leaves that quickly fall off.

Euphorbia grandicornis
Euphorbia grandicornis

Euphorbia horrida
Euphorbia horrida

Euphorbia horrida – in nature, grows in the southern part of the semi-desert Karu (South Africa).

The shape resembles some species of cacti, forms clusters of columnar stems. The stems are 75–150 cm tall and 10–15 cm thick, erect, cylindrical, gray-blue to gray-green, often with white stripes. The ribs are in number 10-20, wing-shaped, protruding, more or less wavy, with grooves between them, with 1-5 spines on the ribs about 4-10 mm long and 1-4 huge main spines up to 4 cm long. The leaves are inconspicuous and short-lived.

Euphorbia enopla – from the south-west of South Africa.

A dioecious succulent shrub 0.3-1 m tall, strongly branched from the base. The stems are thick, finger-sized, columnar or curved, 20–30 cm long and 3 cm in diameter, light grey-green to bluish-green. They have 6-7 ribs with deep grooves between them, with very small tubercles and numerous thick and stiff spines 1-6 cm long, straight or curved, reddish, later blackish and then gray. The leaves are tiny, ephemeral.

Euphorbia enopla
A dense succulent shrub up to 60 cm high, forming a multi-stemmed pillow up to 2 m wide. The stems are erect, juicy, 4-sided (almost square), outwardly resembling cacti. Coloration is light green to grayish-blue. The spines are brown, short, 6 mm long, arranged in pairs at the corners of the ribs. The leaves are small, brown, falling off quickly. Euphorbia resinifera – wildly grows in Morocco, on the slopes of the Atlas Mountains, up to an altitude of 1500 m above sea level.

Euphorbia tirucalli is native to the tropics of Eastern and Southern Africa. A succulent shrub up to 5 m tall, or a small tree up to 12 (15) m tall, with a mass of cylindrical woody brown branches extending from the main trunk and forming a dense crown. Young branches are juicy, smooth, cylindrical, 5-8 mm thick, green, with thin longitudinal white stripes, similar to pencils (hence the common name – pencil tree). The leaves are few, from the smallest linear-lanceolate to narrowly inverse-ovate, fleshy, short-lived.

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