Euphorbia Spherical

Euphorbia Spherical

Euphorbia spherical is a small group with the most succulent – spherical shape of the stem and almost reduced leaves. These species often have varieties and hydrides among themselves and with some other Euphorbias. Often sold vaccinated on more resistant species. Slow-growing and difficult to culture Euphorbia, easily rotting with excessive moisture. In winter, they require cool and dry maintenance. They reproduce mainly by seeds.

Euphorbia obesa is endemic to the South African semi-desert Karoo, where it grows at altitudes of 300-900 m above sea level.

Dioecious, juicy, globular Euphorbia without spines, sometimes “branches”, creating groups of spheres. The stem is spherical in shape or in old age elongated or cone-shaped, up to 20 (-30) cm in height and 9-10 cm in diameter, gray-green, bluish or brownish-green, with transverse red-brown or dull-purple stripes and with 8 clear longitudinal ribs, with shallow furrows between them. On the crests of the ribs are located areolas, like cacti. The leaves are rudimentary, tiny and quickly falling. Small yellow flowers appear at the top of the plant.

Euphorbia obesa
Euphorbia obesa

Euphorbia meloformis f. variegata
Euphorbia meloformis f. variegata

Euphorbia meloformis – grows on carbonate soils of the plains in the Cape Province (South Africa).

Similar to the previous view. Dioecious. Stems with 8-12 ribs, up to 10 cm tall, green or grayish, often with light green or purplish-brown transverse stripes between the ribs. The ribs are blunt, wide, with frequent, every 0.5 cm, areolae. It is distinguished by small yellow flowers on long peduncles that persist on the plant after wilting. With proper care, the stem is covered with powerful branching “thorns”, which are actually woody peduncles.

Euphorbia piscidermis – grows in Ethiopia at altitudes of 1000-1050 m above sea level.

Euphorbia piscidermis
Euphorbia piscidermis

Dwarf Euphorbia, which forms a single stem, can only branch dichotomously with age. The stem is globular, up to 12 cm in height and 7 cm in diameter, tightly covered with spirally arranged tubercles bordered by fringed hairs. The surface of the plant looks like fish scales.

Euphorbia turbiniformis is endemic to northeastern Somalia, where it grows at altitudes of about 300 m above sea level.

Dwarf globular Euphorbia up to 4 cm in height and 4-6 (-8) cm in diameter, without ribs and spikes, with flat, weakly pronounced tubercles arranged in a spiral, smooth with age. Over the years, it can branch dichotomous, forming two to several vertices.

Euphorbia susannae is endemic to several limited areas on the Maloye Karu Plateau in South Africa.

A plant with 12–16 ribs, up to 10 cm tall and 30 cm in diameter, but more often with many branches extending from the rounded caudex. Stems with conspicuous tubercles, without spines, from bright green to dirty brown in color. The leaves are present only on young stems and are reduced to short bristles located on the tops of the tubercles.

Euphorbia gymnocalycioides is native to Southern Ethiopia. It grows on calcareous soils at an altitude of 1350 m above sea level.

The stem is thick, spherical, almost spherical to short-cylindrical, up to 12 cm in height and 10 cm in width, bluish-green, in bright sun with a purple tinge. The tubercles are protruding, separated by deep grooves at a distance of about 1 cm from each other, spirally arranged in 18 rows. Each tubercle ends in a shield up to 2.5 mm in diameter, with scars from the leaves. The leaves are rudimentary and quickly falling. Spines are present only in very young plants.

Euphorbia globosa is native to the Eastern Cape province of South Africa.

Semi-shrub, forming pillows up to 30 cm in diameter. It has a turnip-shaped root and stem consisting of several sparing segments 2.5-4 cm in diameter, with 8-10 ribs. The leaves are reduced, lanceolate, up to 3 mm long, early falling; there are no thorns.

RELATED POST

Leave a Reply