Euphorbia With Developed Leaves

Euphorbia With Developed Leaves

These are species of Euphorbia with well-developed and long-lasting leaves, which in some species can be succulent along with stems. Demanding on light and moisture, they can not be overdried. They are propagated by seeds and cuttings.

Euphorbia milii is native to the island of Madagascar, where it grows mainly on granite outcrops.

The name of the species is associated with the name of Baron Milius, governor of Réunion, who introduced the species to culture in France in 1821.

A strongly branched, semi-succulent shrub up to 1.5-1.8 m tall. The stems are cylindrical, 5-7-sided, about 1 cm in diameter, with many protruding gray spines 1-2 (-3) cm long, with grayish-brown or purplish-brown bark. The leaves are alternate, spirally arranged on the stem, crowded at the tops, simple, dark green to grayish-green in color, reverse-ovate, 1-5 (-6) cm long and about 1.5-2 cm wide, whole-edged. In severe drought, the leaves fall off. The flowers are unisexual (monoecious plants), in inflorescences known as “ciatia”, 6 × 8 mm. Each inflorescence is framed by a pair of bright red (rarely yellow) petal-shaped bracts (ciatophylls), broadly ovate, 12-15 mm across. Each ciatia has 1 female and many male flowers without a corolla and calyx.

  • Euphorbia milii var. splendens is the most common form with red bracts.
  • Euphorbia milii f. lutea – is distinguished by yellow bracts, blooms abundantly and for a long time.
Euphorbia leuconeura
Euphorbia leuconeura

Euphorbia leuconeura is native to Madagascar. A popular plant that resembles the appearance of a palm tree. The stem is succulent, expanding upwards, green, 4-5-sided, with densely haired ribs, topped with a rosette of large oval leaves on long petioles, with a matte dark green surface. In young leaves, the veins are white, which gave the name to the plant. As the stem grows, the leaves fall off. At the base of the leaves, white nondescript cyatia flowers regularly open. The plant shoots around the seeds and is easily propagated by self-sowing.

Euphorbia bubalina (Euphorbia bubalina) – native to the Cape province of South Africa, grows in the coastal strip along the edges.

Shrub 0.3–0.8 (up to 1.3) m tall. The trunk and branches are cylindrical, 1.5–2 m thick, with remnants of overgrown leaf bases. The leaves form rosettes at the tops of the branches, oblong-lobed, 7–10 cm long, with a short tip, strong, thin. Flowers on long peduncles, equipped with 3 bracts.
Euphorbia fulgens is native to Mexico.

Deciduous shrub, 1-1.5 m tall. The stems are thin, long, shiny, arched. The leaves are lanceolate, 7–13 cm long and 1.2–2.5 cm wide, tapered-pointed, whole-edged, dark green, with petioles. Flowers in numbers 5-7, collected umbrella-shaped in leaf nodes; a bedspread on a long leg, with 5 spherical shiny cinnabar blades.

 

Euphorbia bubalina
Euphorbia bubalina

Euphorbia fulgens
Euphorbia fulgens

Euphorbia neriifolia – presumably originates from Central and Southern India. A strongly branched shrub or small tree 2-6 m tall. The branches are whorled, spiraling, indistinctly 5-ribbed. The spines are short, 1-4 mm long, paired, sharp, grayish-brown to black, on low conical truncated, spirally arranged tubercles 2-5 mm high, at a distance of 2-3 cm from each other.

The leaves are located near the end of the branches, fleshy, alternate, almost sessile, ovate, oblong or spaded, 10-18 cm long and 3-4 cm wide at the edge whole, rounded at the apex, glabrous. Leaves fall in late summer and early autumn. Inflorescences of 3-7 small flowers appear in the axils of the upper leaves on short forked peduncles.

Euphorbia neriifolia
Euphorbia neriifolia

A semi-succulent evergreen shrub or small tree, strongly branched from the base, reaching 3.5 (-10) m in height, without thorns. Young branches are round in cross-section, naked, green, purple-green or wine-red, somewhat fleshy, 8-20 mm thick, with age they become woody and thicken.

The leaves are crowded at the ends of the branches, alternate, simple, fleshy, inversely ovate, blunt at the apex, 14-20 cm long and 2.5-7 cm wide, sessile or gradually tapering into a short thick petiole, whole or fine-toothed to the apex at the edge, flat or slightly wavy.

The coloration of the leaves is green, lighter below and often with a reddish tinge on the protruding middle vein. Dark red small flowers are collected in an inflorescence-shield on the top of the peduncle. In indoor conditions, it rarely blooms. Euphorbia umbellata, a synonym for Synadenium grantii. It originates from tropical Africa (Zambezi Valley, Malawi, Western Kenya and southern Uganda). It grows at altitudes of 500-2100 m above sea level.

Euphorbia umbellata f. rubra is a form of garden origin, with large wine-red or bronze-red leaves, or with the same spots.

ynonym for Pedilanthus tithymaloides, is widely distributed in tropical and subtropical America.

The stem of the plant changes direction each time it releases the leaf, resulting in a zigzag shape. Due to this feature, the inhabitants of the plant are called Jacob’s Ladder (Jacob’s Ladder) and Devil’s Backbone (Devil’s Backbone).Erect succulent Euphorbia up to 0.4–3 m in height and 40–60 cm in width, branched from the base. The branches are erect, zigzag, juicy, covered with a waxy coating, thin, cylindrical, green, often leafless before flowering. The leaves are located alternately on the tops of the branches, sessile or almost sessile, naked, simple, ovate or lanceolate, 1-16 cm long and 1-10 cm wide, pointed at the apex, wedge-shaped at the base, whole at the edge. It has an original shape of flowers, which are compared in shape with a bird or with a shoe.

  • The most noticeable trunk fracture is in the subspecies Euphorbia tithymaloides ssp. smalii.
  • Euphorbia tithymaloides f. variegata – with white-bordered leaves that turn pink during flowering or at low winter temperatures. The zigzag stems also have a white stripe.
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